Posts Tagged: ‘psychology’

In 1978, Oberlin psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes coined the term “impostor syndrome” to describe an underlying feeling of being a fraud that often results in undercutting one’s accomplishments. In part two of our four-part series on Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In,” Caroline and I unpack the imposter syndrome in the workplace and explore how to banish that fear because it seems to particularly affect successful women. Sandberg writes that she first heard about imposter syndrome while attending a speech called “Feeling Like a Fraud” by Dr. Peggy McIntosh from the Wellesley Centers for Women, and she later told Salon, “I believe that had I not heard that speech, I would not have the job that I have.”

Tags: , , , , , , ,

When I was in college, I earned extra money on the weekends as a catering waiter. It was as terrible as “Party Down” would have you believe, the entire feeling of the experience summed up in an exchange that happened during a wedding reception. That night, things already weren’t going well, as I accidentally burned one of the staff captains with boiling water before guests had even arrived. Toward the end of the evening, after dinner plates had been cleared, and we were busily refilling coffee — a task that I approached with trepidation since I had already scalded someone only hours earlier — my mounting exhaustion quickly shifted to anger when one of the male guests turned to me with a tipsy smirk and said, “C’mon honey, why don’t you smile?”

I forced a closed-mouth grin and continued making my way around his table.

Tags: , , , , ,

When it comes to gay men, the positive stereotypes abound. In the words of Northwestern University associate professor Brian Mustanski, gay men are often characterized as being “fit, well dressed, good looking and rich,” which doesn’t sound like bad thing at all. A pair of psychologists has examined whether these stereotypes of gay men as striving for (and apparently attaining) perfection holds any merit and have come up with, as a result, The Best Little Boy in the World Hypothesis.

Tags: , , , ,

Imagine a work of art so breathtakingly beautiful that it causes your heart to beat faster and your head to swoon with hallucinations. You’re falling into the painting, through the painting, touching the limits of emotional experience… and then you faint. This Stuff to Blow Your Mind episode dives into the surreal world of Stendhal syndrome. What’s the science behind this psychosomatic illness? How much of it is mere travel shock and how do Rubens Syndrome, Paris Syndrome and Jerusalem Syndrome factor into the mix?

Tags: , ,

A new study from the Maryland Mind Perception and Morality Lab uncovered some surprising similarities in the inferences we make about semi-nude females and males alike.

Tags: , , , ,

Why do small children chat with invisible friends? No, they’re not conversing with ghosts or hosting tea parties for demonic spirits. As it turns out, those creepy cool encounters with unreal beings is just a part of how the human brain works. Think of it as a socialization simulator. And guess what? Even the average adult brain engages in something very similar: social surrogacy. How many of your close friends are fictional?

Tags: , ,

I’m a bit jaded by science. Yes, there’s substantial evidence that life can travel from one planet to another, or at least from Mars to Earth, which strongly suggests that life on Earth came from Mars. What’s more, there may be life on Mars still! Yes, but those are just microbes, so… Also, if life on Earth started on Mars, how did life on Mars start? Psychology as a field and a science is almost entirely underwhelming. Virtually every recent finding using MRI machines is deductive at best and maybe even borderline fraudulent, as, really, MRIs just track the infusion of oxygen from one region of the brain to another.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

We’re all familiar with exorcism rites from various horror flicks, when serious priests supposedly drive trash-talking demons out of innocent victims. But ignoring the more outrageous and unscientific explanations, what’s really happening in these supernatural showdowns between good and evil? And why are they growing in popularity?

Tags: , ,

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month doesn’t take place until October, when the pink and Halloween orange will duke it out for color supremacy (I’d put my cash on pink, FYI), but new research (via Forbes) indicates that it’s time to rethink pink.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Humans don’t like being pushed around, especially when it’s some pencil neck psychology brochure doing the pushing and it’s telling them not to hate another group. This is America, you can’t tell an American who not to hate!

Tags: , , ,

Recent Postings by Category