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PopStuff Show Notes: Episode 119: PopStuff’s License to Kill

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(Photo courtesy Sony Pictures Classics)

Holly and I both love James Bond! So does everyone else, judging by the opening box office of “Skyfall.” We recorded this before we saw it, but I’m typing up the show notes after having seen it, which is a little weird. Here’s what we talked about:

  • Spies! Secretive by necessity, which leads to fantasy.
  • James Bond as a fairy tale
  • James Bond as psychopath
  • James Bond as a Slytherin
  • Action movies vs. spy thriller
  • James Bond, Doctor Who and my favorite of each
  • Holly’s favorite James Bond(s)
  • Holly’s favorite James Bond movie (which is a surprise)
  • James Bond’s rise vs. Britain’s decline as a global political power
  • Nationalism
  • New James Bond books, courtesy the James Bond estate
  • Brian’s theory of James Bond and why multiple people can play him
  • Living vicariously through James Bond
  • James Bond video games
  • James Bond’s Aston Martins and BMWs
  • Bond Girls and masculinity
  • Soundtracks and theme songs
  • James Bond’s womanizing vs. Don Draper’s womanizing
  • OPI’s James Bond polishes
  • Spy gadgets and Q
  • Listener mail! It’s about bronies, from Jim
  • How James Bond Works and How Spy Gadgets Work

My research:

  • Arnett, Robert P. “Casino Royale and Franchise Remix: James Bond as Superhero.” Film Criticism.
  • Carpenter, Richard C. “007 and the Myth of the Hero.” Journal of Pop Culture. Volume 1, Issue 2.
  • Dodds, Klaus. “Licensed to Stereotype: Popular Geopolitics, James Bond and the Spectre of Balkanism.” Geopolitics. Vol. 8, No. 2. Summer 2003.
  •  Garland, Tony W. “The Coldest Weapon of All: The Bond Girl Villain in James Bond Films.” Journal of Popular Film and Television. 2009.
  • O’Sullivan, Paul. “Spy Fiction: Then and Now.” New Zealand International Review.
  • Price, Thomas J. “Popular Perceptions of an Ally: ‘The Special Relationship’ in the British Spy Novel.” Journal of Popular Culture. Vol. 28, Issue 2.
  • Price, Thomas J. “Spy Stories, Espionage and the Public in the Twentieth Century.” Journal of Popular Culture. Vol. 30, Issue 3.

Holly’s research:

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